Giving Politicians Permission: How Many People Live on Your Block?

My next few blogs are a response to an article in the “Los Angeles Times,” February 14, 2012.  I have been writing/teaching about voting in the United States for almost fifty years.  There are so many more problems than I suspected.  The Times article talks about “Pew Report: One in eight voting registrations inaccurate.”  One in eight.  This blog will consider ANOTHER part of the problem: 51 million potential voters are not registered and are unable to participate in elections.  That’s 25% of the electorate added to the one in eight inaccurate registrations.

First, let me explain what that means to me.  I live on a cul-de-sac with 15 homes.  I have not done a poll about which of my neighbors vote.  But I can count the adults on the block and, for the sake of this blog, I am assuming that all of them could vote.  One house is empty and there are 24 adults in the other homes.   If 75% of them, three out of every four, actually vote, that means that 6 can not vote because they have not registered.

Would it be acceptable if?

  • ·        25% of the people  in your family didn’t do their chores?
  • ·        Your car didn’t run 25% of the time?
  • ·        Your electricity was off 25% of the time?
  • ·        25% of the kids in every class flunked?
  • ·        You were on a sinking ship and 25% of the people on the ship choose not to help bail out the water?

Only 75% of the eligible voters in our country are bailing on our sinking ship of state – plus the issue of 1 out of every 8 voting registrations being inaccurate.  I taught U.S. history and government and we talked about the right to vote often.  Today we are looking at the need to vote.

How many people live on your block?

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